archatlas:

X-Rays of Toys Brendan Fitzpatrick 

Behold, the Tinder of Architecture

99percentinvisible:

UrbanGems helps you find the most scenic route from here to there based on your taste

lustik:

“Oh my CAD!” - Beforelight via WeWasteTime

(Source: owluminati)

archatlas:

Casa Tomada Rafael Gómez Barros

"The urban interventions are meant to represent displacement of peasants in his native Columbia due to war and violence, themes that resonate in one form or another in any country his work is displayed in. Crafted from tree branches, fiberglass, and fabric, the 2 foot ants are particularly striking when seen clustered aggressively on facades of buildings."

npr:

"Craft Beer Reaches New Depths As Mainers Brew A Batch From Seaweed" via Jay Field

Strange varieties of beer pack the shelves of most specialty grocery stores. Some brews are flavored with fruit or spices, while more peculiar selections include elements like yeast scraped from a 35 million-year-old whale bone. Marshall Wharf Brewing Co. –– already known for adding odd ingredients such as oysters or habanero peppers –– has crafted something new to most U.S. drinkers: seaweed beer

– Alexander

Images: Jay Field/MPBN

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

99percentinvisible:

Where are the designers? (From thisiscitylab)

Minneapolis! Providence! What pleasant surprises!